The 2020 BMW 1 Series

BMW 1 Series (2020) Review

The 2020 BMW 1 Series
The 2020 BMW 1 Series on location in Ireland

Caroline drives the new BMW 1 Series!

Created as a stylish hatchback for the first time back in 2004, the BMW 1 Series was a prestigious first step on the BMW ladder for many young, aspirational buyers. The 1 Series packaged the quality, prestige and exciting driving dynamics of a classic BMW saloon into a compact hatchback that marked a more affordable entry into the BMW range.

BMW is not unique in this respect, every year the 1 Series squares up to the equally smart Mercedes-Benz A-Class and Audi A3. Competition is high in the race to capture the hearts and minds of well-heeled young professionals. Style and premium features are a given but in recent years this race has intensified as digital natives become the target audience.

So enter the latest generation of the 1 Series. Pricing kicks off from €33,864 in Ireland, putting it in premium territory. Yet the brand has reworked the 1 to make it a better prospect, at least in practical terms, and this feels like new beginnings for the prestigious German hatchback.

For a start the 1 has switched from a sporty rear wheel drive layout to a less exclusive front wheel drive layout. The key positive to this is that a front wheel drive layout makes it easier for designers to create more space inside the vehicle. The 1 Series now shares a platform with other front wheel drive BMW Group products like the MINI Countryman and the BMW 2 Series Active Tourer.

The new 1 Series goes on sale in Ireland
The new 1 Series goes on sale in Ireland from €33,864

The BMW 1 Series range in Ireland

Being related to an MPV doesn't sound exceptionally glam, but you can be sure BMW has some tricks up their sleeve for the sporty 1. But first, there is lots on offer in the 1 Series range - from demure diesels to rip roaring performance petrol variants. In Ireland, the new 1 Series range is made up of three trim levels – SE (from €33,864), Sport (from €35,245) and M Sport (from €37,715). You can choose from the 118i petrol (140 hp), 116d diesel (116 hp), 118d diesel (150 hp) or rev it up with a more powerful 120d diesel (190 hp) or the top of the range M135i with 306 hp and all wheel drive (from €52,850).

In terms of design, the new 1 Series has a different vibe to what has come before. It looks bigger and has all the hallmarks of the brand’s new design language. Angles here and there, a larger BMW kidney grille at the front and an epic rear end with new horizonal light clusters. The new 1 Series looks its best in M Sport trim, which sits lower on the road with a more aggressive body kit and 18” alloys as well as satin aluminium struts in the kidney grille.

What’s it like inside?

This car feels young, fresh and current inside, and trendsetters will love it. The new interior takes all the best bits from the larger 3 Series with a few new additions such as glam backlit trim elements. Quality is very impressive for a compact, making this feel like a car from the class above. It’s an interior very worthy of the BMW badge. You sit quite low among a driver-oriented cockpit with all of BMW’s latest digital technology at your fingertips. It’s in its best iteration with the BMW Live Cockpit Professional incorporating a digital instrument panel and 10.25” Control Display. Another neat feature is the BMW Intelligent Personal Assistant, which allows you to alter the car’s settings, ventilation or find a list of local restaurants for example using a simple summons of ‘Hey BMW’.

Inside the new BMW 1 Series
Inside the new BMW 1 Series

Some purists might baulk at the new space saving front wheel drive layout but it has reaped dividends for interior space inside the vehicle. Now the BMW 1 Series can attract family buyers because there is more space in the rear and the boot. Access to the rear is easier and there is extra kneeroom, headroom and elbowroom available. The boot capacity has been improved by 20 litres to 380 litres, with a wider opening than before. An electrically operated tailgate is now optionally available for the BMW 1 Series for the first time.

On the road in the new BMW 1 Series

BMW has shaved up to 30 kg off the weight of the new BMW 1 Series compared to its predecessor but increased the rigidity. This is thanks to an aluminium bonnet and boot lid, combined with high-strength steels. Much has been made of the switch to a front wheel drive layout. But BMW engineers have worked hard to ensure the 1 Series drives like a classic BMW saloon. ARB technology first used in the BMW i3 comes as standard on the 1 Series to improve traction, reduce wheel slip and understeer. In fact, it’s the first time it has been used in a combustion engine BMW.

The result is good. The 1 Series can take on corners with gusto, with an impressively tight turn in and stability while doing it. It is a very good front wheel drive hatchback. It lacks the dynamic fluidity of a rear wheel drive BMW, for example the larger 3 Series, because the steering just doesn't translate the same sensations to your fingertips.

Overall refinement is excellent and this car covers the tarmac well, despite the M Sport treatment giving a tad firmer ride. Long distance motorway cruising is very pleasant behind the wheel of the 1 Series. The 118i does a fine job here for a three cylinder petrol engine. Modifications to this 1.5-litre petrol engine have cut CO2 emissions by 29g/km, at the same time boosting maximum power output by 4 hp to 140 hp. The engine feels lively enough and smooths out well at speed. Gear changes through the new 7-speed automatic are well judged. Over a week of driving my fuel consumption averaged at 6.5l/100km, which is decent enough for a petrol engine.

The new M135i with 306 hp and all wheel drive!

Did you like it?

The BMW 1 Series has grown up, becoming a better prospect despite a somewhat more muted drive. The rear wheel drive playfulness is gone but BMW has created a good front wheel drive hatchback. The boost in practicality and space inside the vehicle just makes so much more sense for buyers and it can now function as a respectable family hatchback.

The biggest surprise for me with the new 1 Series is how well the new generation BMW interior fits in here. The cabin experience is now one of the most successful features of this car.

While there are a good selection of trims and engines available, the 118i M Sport is a nice spot in the range combining a sporty look with affordability and quiet petrol power.

The 1 Series has always been an aspirational car that gets you on the ladder and theoretically *should* convert you to BMW for life. For that BMW has created a fine hatchback for the 2020s that its younger buyers will love!

The BMW 1 Series is a smart and stylish premium hatchback
The BMW 1 Series is a smart and stylish premium hatchback

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: BMW 1 Series 118i Automatic M Sport
Price: 
€37,715 (from €33,864)
Engine: 1.5-litre turbo petrol
Power: 
140hp
Torque: 220 Nm
0-100km/h:  
8.5 seconds
Top speed: 213 km/h
CO2 emissions: 122g/100km
Motor Tax: €270 per year


The new Toyota Corolla GR Sport is now on sale in Ireland

Toyota Corolla GR Sport (2020) Review

The new Toyota Corolla GR Sport is now on sale in Ireland
The new Toyota Corolla GR Sport is now on sale in Ireland

Caroline drives the new Toyota Corolla GR Sport!

2019 saw the arrival of the all-new Toyota Corolla to Ireland. The Corolla’s arrival was heralded by three new derivatives – hatchback, estate and saloon – with hybrid a key part of the brand’s mission in the compact segment.

The new Corolla has been an indisputable success in Ireland and is the 2020 Continental Tyres Irish Medium Car of the Year.

What’s so great about the new Toyota Corolla?

Well there are three distinct models all with fuel sipping hybrid powertrains built upon Toyota’s more agile and dynamic TNGA platform. All feature modern interior design and there are even optional two tone paint finishes that take even more years off the Corolla. This car has never looked better. Now Toyota sees even more potential with this car, introducing a sportier hybrid powertrain and new GR Sport trim level, exclusive to the Corolla Hatchback.

It’s wonderful to watch the Corolla explore its new, more fashionable position in the market. It's even better to experience this car from the driver’s seat. I couldn’t quite believe that I was picking up a sporty Corolla. For too long Corolla stood for sensible, reliable transport. But it was hardly a car that you really, really desired to drive, over say a Ford Focus or Volkswagen Golf. Now all that has changed.

Toyota has big plans, not least a rumoured full on Corolla GR performance hatchback in the next few years, a follow up to the rapturous Yaris GR. The GR Sport is a trim level where you get sportier visual updates to the car inspired by high performance models. To recap GR stands for the wonderfully named Toyota performance division ‘Gazoo Racing’. The Corolla GR Sport is just the second model to join the European GR Sport line-up following the introduction of the Yaris GR Sport in 2019.

The GR Sport gives a sporty makeover to the Corolla, Ireland's bestselling car
The GR Sport gives a sporty makeover to the Corolla, Ireland's bestselling car

What features does the Corolla GR Sport get?

The Corolla Hatchback range starts from €26,390 in Ireland and now exclusively uses a petrol electric hybrid powertrain. There are two hybrid powertrains to choose from - the 1.8-litre with 122 hp that we tested last year in the Corolla Hatchback - and the more powerful 2.0-litre hybrid with 184 hp tested here in GR Sport specification. This top of the range model has a list price of €35,053. The GR Sport trim level is also available with the 1.8-litre hybrid powertrain. It retails from €32,485 in this configuration.

The GR Sport makeover looks really good on the Corolla. It’s a handsome hatchback anyway but sporty features look genuinely comfortable here. The Toyota Gazoo Racing influence comes in distinctive styling elements like a new honeycomb mesh pattern front grille with piano black surrounds, lower skirts, and sills. At the rear there is a silver insert in the lower bumper, creating the look of twin tailpipes and a diffuser. A black roof comes as standard matched to a choice of five body colours. Wheels are 18” black alloy with a contrasting bright machined finish to the tips of each spoke and red GR centre caps. There is also rear privacy glass and bi-LED headlights. The finishing touches are black backgrounds for the Toyota emblems on the bonnet and boot lid, and official GR badging.

What's it like inside?

Inside the GR Sport has a few bespoke features too. There are lots of soft touch black panel finishes. Red stitching on the gear selector, steering wheel and seats adds a nice contrast. The seats have a sports design with fabric in the centre and leather-effect bolsters. They are comfortable and supportive. The GR Sport also benefits from the same interior technology as the rest of the Corolla range. Infotainment is controlled via a touchscreen that can connect to a smartphone via Bluetooth. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity has just been added to the 2020 Corolla range too.

The interior of the 2020 Toyota Corolla GR Sport
The interior of the 2020 Toyota Corolla GR Sport

There's a new seven-inch colour TFT multi-information screen. Other standard features include Toyota Safety Sense, smart entry, rear privacy glass, automatic wipers, auto-dimming rear-view mirror and power-adjustable door mirrors with an auto-folding function.

The Corolla Hatchback will seat five however the Touring Sports (estate) and Saloon have more legroom because of a longer wheelbase. The rear legroom in the hatchback is on the small side for this class of vehicle, especially if there is a tall driver and front seat passenger! Boot space in the 2.0-litre hybrid models is also slightly compromised because the car’s battery is positioned under the boot floor. The standard Corolla Hatchback has 361 litres of boot space, however the 2.0-litre hybrid has less at 313 litres.

On the road in the 2020 Toyota Corolla GR Sport!

Driving the new Corolla GR Sport was an opportunity to experience the brand’s new 2.0-litre hybrid powertrain. There’s more power and torque than in the standard 1.8-litre version. It has been engineered to be more responsive and fun to drive. This is all while still retaining a low emission hybrid powertrain.

Immediately the hybrid engine impressed me. It feels faster, more robust, smoother and more mature in drive. Power delivery is on the pedal responsive and with 184 hp, the Corolla 2.0-litre can really take off. The Corolla is a much improved car dynamically. I enjoyed the more powerful set-up in this car with smoother CVT automatic operation. Paddle shift gear changes are also possible. Over a week of driving my average fuel consumption was 7.1 litres per 100 km, while motor tax is just €180 per year.

My verdict on this car is two fold as I’m essentially reviewing two things – the GR Sport spec additions and the 2.0-litre hybrid powertrain.

Last year I performed a number of test drives with the Corolla 1.8 litre and for many people this engine will suffice. It is the one to go for if you are genuinely looking for a fuel sipping car to save on fuel costs as time and time again it returned great economy for me. The 2.0-litre hybrid is more powerful and fun to drive. It feels like a more grown up affair yet fuel consumption does suffer a bit with the more performance bias of the design.

The Toyota Corolla GR Sport explores Corolla's sporty new character
The Toyota Corolla GR Sport explores Corolla's sporty new character

I think the GR Sport is a wonderful addition to the range. I adore the sporty look of this Corolla.

Corolla has grown up and got some street cred. The GR Sport explores the Corolla’s cool new character even more!

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Toyota Corolla GR Sport 2.0-litre Hybrid
Price: 
€35,053 (from €26,390)
Engine: 2.0-litre petrol electric hybrid
Power: 
184 hp
Torque: 190 Nm
0-100km/h:  
7.9 seconds
Top speed: 180 km/h
Fuel consumption (WLTP): 
5.3 l/100km
CO2 emissions (WLTP):
120 g/km
Motor Tax: €180 per year


The Honda Civic Hatchback is available from €24,250

Honda Civic (2020) Review

The Honda Civic Hatchback is available from €24,250
The Honda Civic Hatchback is available from €24,250

If you are interested in finding out more about the Honda Civic 2020 range, check out our Irish road test review of this Civic Diesel model. In 2020 Honda revamped the popular Civic with some exterior styling enhancements and improvements to the infotainment system and materials used in the cabin.

Did someone tell you diesel was dead? Well Honda Ireland certainly doesn’t think so. The brand cheekily launched their new Honda Civic Diesel to the media in 2018 with the tagline ‘Never Say (Die)sel'. And after driving the new Honda Civic Diesel, I can say that it’s no surprise that Honda are confident that this car has plenty more mileage left in it!

In 2017 Honda launched the new tenth generation Civic to widespread acclaim, with the car collecting the Continental Tyres 2018 Irish Compact Car of the Year Award. The new Civic was launched with two new petrol engines: Civic 1.0-litre and Civic 1.5-litre, which are good engines, but we were promised a diesel at a later date. Civic Diesel has now been on sale in Ireland since 2018.

The Honda Civic Saloon joined the range in 2018 boasting an even more elegant design, large boot and comfortable cabin. The brand also sells the raucous Honda Civic Type R in Ireland with an inspiring 320 hp.

Manual and CVT automatic gearboxes are available, while Honda has since added the option of a 9-speed dual clutch automatic transmission to the diesel range.

The interior of the Honda Civic Diesel
The interior of the Honda Civic Diesel

Does the Honda Civic Diesel make a good family hatchback?

The Honda Civic does a lot of things right. Honda has toned down the styling to make it more palatable. But it’s still very sporty and avantgarde for the compact segment. The Civic is genuinely spacious inside and buyers get a lot of ‘bang for their buck’. The boot is 478 litres, one of the biggest in the class, and the rear foot wells are large also. Up front it feels like a larger car too when compared to many rivals.

Inside new Civic, Honda has toned down the confusing dash layout and screens of the previous model. Instead they have opted for a more ordinary and conventional appearance. It's all the better for it. The material quality and build is very good, though a Volkswagen Golf is more premium feeling.

Pricing and equipment for new Civic

In Ireland the Civic range kicks off at €24,250 for a 1.0-litre petrol hatchback, while the Civic Diesel range kicks off at €26,425. The Saloon is pitched higher in the range, with pricing starting from €27,385. Standard equipment includes 16” alloys, Bluetooth, parking sensors, and automatic air conditioning. Impressively, the Honda Sensing suite of safety equipment comes as standard including traffic sign recognition, adaptive cruise control, road departure mitigation, lane departure warning, lane keep assist, forward collision warning and collision mitigation braking system.

The Honda Civic has been lightly updated for 2020
The Honda Civic has been lightly updated for 2020

My test car was a 1.6 i-DTEC Smart Plus hatchback retailing at €28,895. It's not the cheap option for sure but there's more equipment including 17" alloys, Honda Connect infotainment with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, dual zone climate control, rear parking camera, privacy glass, fog lights, driver lumbar support, auto wipers and leather steering wheel.

What's the new Honda Civic Diesel like to drive?

The Honda Civic Diesel is also one of the best diesel hatchbacks to drive and very efficient. Over a few days of driving my fuel consumption was 5.3 litres per 100 km and motor tax is just €180 per year. The diesel engine suits the Civic perfectly. There is great flexibility in the engine allowing for very smooth driving, while it has plenty of power to make the most of the Civic's agile handling and sporty steering. The Civic Diesel is refined on the move and not at all laboursome to drive, even with a 6-speed manual gearbox.

At Changing Lanes we have been a fan of the new Civic since we first drove it at the European press launch in February 2017. Since then we've been able to sample a variety of models across the Civic range. This compact car always impresses for its strong build and quality, and fun to drive qualities. Yet put a diesel in it, and you have one of the best iterations of this car yet. The Civic's sporty looks are not for everyone but don't let it put you off. This is still one of the best hatchbacks on the market.

The new Honda Civic Diesel is not the cheapest diesel family hatchback you can buy, but on the whole in terms of space, equipment and safety features, it is good value. This is a fuel sipping hatchback that’s also great fun to drive. The Honda Civic Diesel has miles more life in it. It’s a fantastic diesel hatchback.

The new Honda Civic Saloon
The new Honda Civic Saloon

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Honda Civic 1.6 i-DTEC Smart Plus
Price: 
€28,895 (Range from €24,250)
Engine: 1.6-litre turbo diesel
Power: 
120hp
Torque: 300Nm
0-100km/h:  
10.1 seconds
Top speed: 201km/h
Claimed Economy: 
3.5l/100km
CO2 emissions:  
93g/km
Motor tax: 
€180 per year


The 2020 Renault Mégane Coupé

Renault Mégane Grand Coupé (2020) Review


The 2020 Renault Mégane Coupé
The 2020 Renault Mégane Coupé

Caroline drives the new Renault Mégane Grand Coupé.

A Renault Mégane saloon has always done well in Ireland, with us being a nation of ‘big boot out the back’ lovers. Saloon sales are on a squeeze from SUVs, but Renault Ireland still believes in the value of the compact saloon in the Irish market. In 2017, the new Renault Mégane Grand Coupé (fancy name too!) arrived in Ireland to join the Mégane hatchback and Sport Tourer (estate).

Renault was right to defy market trends. The Mégane with a boot is now the bestselling model in the compact Mégane range in Ireland, outselling the hatchback and Sport Tourer.

What’s new for the Renault Mégane Saloon in 2020?

Renault Ireland refreshed the Grand Coupé line-up in 2019. There are now three trim levels as opposed to four - Play, Iconic and Signature. And a petrol engine has joined the range for the first time. The new 1.3 TCe 140 engine is available in the Grand Coupé with a 6-speed manual or new 7-speed EDC automatic gearbox.

Renault’s 1.5 dCi engine has also been enhanced in 2019 with increased power at 115 hp and is also available with 6-speed manual and 7-speed EDC gearboxes.

Renault has strapped the Grand Coupé moniker onto the Mégane saloon, which implies that this car has ‘notions’. But it’s not difficult to understand the popularity of this car. It’s a good looking car with design flair and elegant proportions giving it the presence of a larger and more expensive car.

The Grand Coupé range starts from €24,390 in Ireland, which is just a €900 premium over the Mégane hatchback like for like on spec and engine. But buyers actually get a more spacious car because the wheelbase is longer than that of the hatchback. The rear legroom is more accommodating. The boot has a capacity of 503 litres, bigger than the hatchback, with reasonably good access for a saloon. Also since I last tested the car there is now a release button on the boot lid, which is great.

The interior of the Renault Mégane Grand Coupé
The interior of the Renault Mégane Grand Coupé

What are my options?

The Play trim level (from €24,390) replaces both the Expression and Dynamique Nav trims. Equipment includes Apple CarPlay® and Android Auto®, 7” touch screen, climate control and parking sensors.

The Iconic (from €26,590) replaces the Dynamique S Nav and has built-in navigation (7” screen), Multi-sense driving modes and the Visio Active safety system.

The sporty GT Line is preserved for the hatch, while the Grand Coupé gets the ‘grander’ Signature trim (from €28,890). This model has leather interior, 18” diamond cut wheels, 8.7” navigation screen and full LED lights.

The Renault Mégane Grand Coupé has a lot of rasmatazz on the outside but it’s a bit plainer on the inside. The most striking feature is probably the portrait style touchscreen which is quite unique in the segment. The interior is hardly the last word in sophistication with quite a few hard, scratchy plastics, but it’s perfectly acceptable.

Driving the Renault Mégane Grand Coupé

The new petrol engine is a great addition to the Mégane Grand Coupé range. It’s a 1.3-litre turbo petrol unit that’s popping up in other Renault models too like the Kadjar. It’s got lots of power at 140 hp and over a week of driving my fuel consumption averaged at 6.3 l/100km, with motor tax of €270 per year. There is also a 1.5-litre diesel engine with 110hp, which is the best for economy.

On the road the Renault Mégane Grand Coupé 1.3 TCe is nippy and refined. The car moves well through corners with precision and good cruising ability on the motorway too. The gear change feels a bit slack but other than that I really enjoyed my time with this car. The ride comfort seemed more cosseting this time round too.

The Renault Mégane Grand Coupé is very impressive with this new petrol engine. This is a stylish saloon and while competition is fierce in the compact segment, the Grand Coupé has really hit its stride in terms of spec, comfort and refinement. The figures don’t lie. It’s Ireland’s favourite iteration of the Mégane and the addition of this smart little petrol engine should enhance its prospects even more.


The Renault Mégane Grand Coupé brings considerable style and space to the range
The Renault Mégane Grand Coupé brings considerable style and space to the range

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Renault Megane Grand Coupé Signature TCe 140 GPF
Price:
€28,890 (Range from €24,390)
Engine: 1.3-litre turbo petrol
Power: 
140 hp
Torque: 240 Nm
0-100km/h:  
9.7 seconds
Top speed: 203 km/h
Fuel Economy: 
5.7l/100km
CO2 emissions: 
130g/km
Motor tax: 
€270 per year


The Ford Focus (2011-2018)

Ford Focus Used Car Review (2011-2018)

The Ford Focus (2011-2018)
The Ford Focus (2011-2018)

Check out our Ford Focus used car review!

Changing Lanes reviewed the third generation Ford Focus in early 2014. This generation of the Ford Focus was a huge success and wasn't replaced until 2018. That means we now have a classic used car review on our hands of one of Ireland's favourite hatchbacks! I've taken my original review of the 2014 Ford Focus and updated it with some new information. This article is aimed at you if you are in the market for a used Ford Focus from between the years of 2011 and 2018. 

Back in 2014, I was relatively new to reviewing cars. I was developing 'a nose' for a good car. But I still remember getting into the Focus and being astounded at just how much good fun to drive it was. Because it certainly never looked very good from the outside. A facelift in 2015 improved things somewhat, but in truth this generation of the Ford Focus was never a beauty queen. Lucky it had another ace card up its sleeve.

Ford Focus Review

So I began my review by saying that this generation of the Ford Focus had been around since 2011 but a new model  was just around the corner. My words: why is it still one of the bestselling hatchbacks in its class? Let’s find out.

The Ford Focus between 2011 and 2018 was sold as a five door hatchback, four door saloon and practical estate car. Entry level models look quite dull but Zetec, Titanium and Zetec-S add more sparkle. The Zetec-S models are particularly good looking, inspired by sporty ST models with a body kit and special alloy wheels. Towards the end of production, Zetec-S was replaced by ST line, which we reviewed in the 2017 Ford Focus 2.0-litre diesel. The Titanium is the smart one with excellent equipment levels.

The interior of the 2015 Ford Focus
The interior of the 2015 Ford Focus

Inside, the driving position is spot on but interior design isn't the strong point for the 2014 Ford Focus. The interior is quite drab though it is well built with good enough quality for a hatchback of this era. Again, high spec cars get some more interesting trim elements. On Focus models between 2011 and 2015, there was a lot of buttons on the centre console to control media and ventilation. However this was rectified to a more streamlined look and updated infotainment in 2015. So post-facelift models should be sought for the step forward they bring in cabin experience.

Anything else?

The cabin is roomy enough for a car of this size, but a Volkswagen Golf  of the same era feels more spacious in that regard. One of the most disappointing features is the boot, which is small by class standards at 316 litres with a mini spare wheel, but a more respectable 363 with a tyre repair kit. It does have the advantage of a low and relatively flat sill and a practical shape, but a 2014 Peugeot 308 trumps it with 470 litres of usable space. The Focus estate has a much more practical boot.

The Ford Focus Estate offers more practical space
The Ford Focus Estate offers more practical space

We were really impressed with the Ford Focus on the road. Precise steering and good body control make it a really great car to drive, much more fun than rivals like the Volkswagen Golf or a Peugeot 308. It feels settled and composed over a variety of road surfaces ensuring a smooth, comfortable ride for everyone on board. There is true magic in this generation of the Ford Focus, with an elastic feel to the steering that means you could out drive most competitors. In fact the third generation of the Ford Focus is sharper than the current generation in that regard. So you will enjoy driving your used Ford Focus very much!

Is the Ford Focus reliable?

Over its lifetime, engines included a 1.6-litre TDCi diesel with 95 hp or 115 hp, and a 2.0-litre diesel with 150 hp. In 2015 the 1.6-litre was replaced by a 1.5-litre TDCi diesel with 120 hp that was a much improved unit. On the petrol side of things, the launch of the Ford Focus 1.0-litre Ecoboost petrol engine was big news at the time. It was available with 100 or 125 hp and was a truly excellent engine, yet could never return as good economy as the diesels.

We tested the Ford Focus 1.6 TDCi 95 hp diesel engine. Fuel saving start/stop technology is standard with the 1.6 TDCi engine. The official economy is a good 67 mpg. With CO2 emissions of 109g/km, this Focus will cost €190 to tax each year. It had enough power but was a noisy engine compared to rival offerings. We much preferred driving the 2015 Ford Focus EcoBoost 125 hp, which was smooth, quiet and fun.

Post 2015 Ford Focus facelift models have better interiors and design
Post 2015 Ford Focus facelift models have better interiors and design

Standard equipment on our 2014 Ford Focus Edition included electric front windows and mirrors, remote central locking, 16" alloys, Ford SYNC, manual air conditioning, leather trimmed steering wheel and trip computer. Zetec trim added front fog lamps, chrome belt line finisher, quickclear windscreen, sports tuned suspension and sports styled front seats. Titanium trim added dual zone air conditioning, start button, cruise control and speed limiter, hill start assist and more. Ford SYNC infotainment came as standard on all but entry level models. It allows you to operate functions like playing music or making phone calls by voice control but was never the best system on the marker.

Is the Ford Focus a good car?

That's a whistle stop tour of the 2014 Ford Focus, the third generation of an icon. There are so many of these cars available and they found many homes in Ireland. The Ford Focus fits the bill for so many people. It wasn't perfect - the interior was fairly dull, it didn't use the space inside the vehicle as well as some rivals...but the Focus always redeemed itself for its impeccable driving manners. It makes the mundane fun. Diesel engines were noisy but economical, while the EcoBoost engine is a pure gem. It was also very keenly priced against rivals. Hot Ford Focus ST and Focus RS versions were also available, which we liked very much.

I hope our Ford Focus used car review has been useful. Let us know your experience of this generation of the Focus.

Ford Focus ST hot hatchback
Ford Focus ST hot hatchback

Details correct at time of test

Model tested: Ford Focus Edition 5-door hatch
Price: €22,995 (Range starts at €19,395)
Engine: 1.6-litre, four cylinder turbo diesel
Power: 95 bhp
0-100km/h: 12.5 seconds
Economy: 67mpg (4.2l/100km)
CO2 emissions:  109g/km
Tax band: A3 (€190 per year)

Caroline Kidd


The new Kia XCeed!

Kia XCeed 1.6 Diesel (2020) Review

The new Kia XCeed!
The new Kia XCeed!

Caroline reviews the new Kia XCeed!

Since the launch of the new Kia Ceed in the summer of 2018, Kia has created a number of spin-offs to appeal to different buyers of compact vehicles. There was the practical Ceed SW followed by the elegant ProCeed shooting brake. Now in 2020 we say hello to probably the most desirable of them all – the new Kia XCeed!

Why so desirable? Well that’s because the XCeed is a crossover and Europe loves a good crossover right now. So does Ireland. Kia claims compact SUV practicality for the XCeed along with the sporty packaging and engaging handling of a hatchback. The new XCeed goes on sale from €26,345, so buyers do pay more for the prestige of this vehicle over an equivalent Ceed hatchback.

What's so hot right now about the Kia XCeed?

So is it worth it? In the metal the new XCeed has got a great stance. The only body panels carried over from the five-door Ceed hatchback are the front doors. While the wheelbase remains the same as other models in the Ceed line-up, the 2020 Kia XCeed has longer front and rear overhangs. The proportions are still compact but the ride height has been raise by up to 42 mm over the Ceed hatch. Wheel arch and side sill cladding along with silver roof rails give the car a tougher, SUV-like presence, with the metallic valance in the rear bumper enhancing this effect. My grey test car looked smart and premium but to really stand out there is a vibrant new Quantum Yellow shade that is unique to the XCeed!

Caroline in the cabin of the Kia XCeed
Caroline in the cabin of the Kia XCeed

What's it like inside?

The cabin design of the new XCeed is more or less the same as what we’ve seen in other members of the Ceed family. So that means a contemporary design with the latest Kia infotainment system and good quality fit and finish. The 10.25 inch touchscreen in my test car was really nice to use, with large graphics, clear interface and seamless integration with smartphones. A new yellow colour pack is unique to the XCeed and adds more fun and character. Black upholstery is contrasted with vibrant yellow stitching for seats and doors, yellow seat piping, and a blend of gloss black and metallic yellow highlights throughout the cabin.

Interior space is also good for the compact class, with reasonably sized footwells in the rear. The higher roofline adds a greater feeling of space to the interior. The hip point for each seat is raised by up to 42 mm over the Ceed hatch so it is easier for occupants to step in or out. The boot is also bigger by 31 litres with a total volume of 426 litres.

The XCeed goes on sale in Ireland from €26,345
The XCeed goes on sale in Ireland from €26,345

In Ireland, the new Kia XCeed is offered in three trim levels (K2,K3 and K4). Engine options include a 1.0-litre turbo petrol with 120 hp or a 1.6-litre diesel with 115 hp. A new XCeed plug-in hybrid will join the range from April priced from €28,945. Standard equipment includes 16“ alloys, LED lights front and rear, rear privacy glass, 8 inch touchscreen with Android Auto and Apple Car Play, and a host of safety features including Lane Keep Assist, Forward Collision Avoidance, High Beam Assist and Speed Limit Assist.

My test car was a K3 diesel with 18” alloys, 10.25 inch touchscreen with Sat Nav /Tom Tom and rear view camera, half leather upholstery, electronic parking brake and a wireless phone charger. The list price for this model is €30,495.

The K4 completes the range with added features such as heated front seats ,12.3 inch supervision instrument cluster, smart key with push button start, climate control and Blind Spot Detection.

Driving the 2020 Kia XCeed

Kia’s European engineering team developed the suspension and steering of the Kia XCeed to deliver a comfortable ride and more engaging handling. According to the brand, the new XCeed was tested across a wider range of road surfaces than any previous European-developed Kia to ensure the handling character was ‘truly European’.

On the road, buyers will enjoy the more commanding view of the road ahead compared with a conventional hatchback. The XCeed is agile and fun to drive. Unique suspension tuning accommodates for the raise in ride height ensuring the new XCeed feels nothing short of accomplished and comfortable over a variety of Irish roads. Road noise has been reduced also.

The interior of the new Kia XCeed
The interior of the new Kia XCeed

Diesel is still an important fuel for motoring in some parts of the country and indeed for all high mileage drivers. The Kia XCeed 1.6-litre diesel offers enough power and torque, however it’s not the most refined or efficient diesel on the market right now in the compact segment. Over a week of driving my average fuel consumption was 5.9l/100km while motor tax is €200 per year.

So did you like it?

The 2020 Kia XCeed offers buyers now even more style and individuality in the compact segment. The design of this vehicle has been wonderfully executed and on style and image alone, the XCeed should find many homes. Everything we loved about the new Ceed is retained and enhanced here. So the cabin is good quality but lifted a little more with the addition of the optional coloured trim. And there is a more spacious and practical nature to this car though dimensions are still compact.

The diesel engine wouldn’t be my first choice but there is a 1.0-litre turbo petrol engine available and a new plug-in hybrid that will allow buyers to explore battery technology without range anxiety.

The Kia XCeed does carry a premium for its fashionable looks but buyers have shown again and again that they will go that extra mile for the SUV/crossover look.

The new XCeed is a fantastic addition to the Kia range!

Would you be brave enough for Quantum Yellow?
Would you be brave enough for Quantum Yellow?

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Kia XCeed 1.6 CRDi K3
Price: 
€30,495 (from €26,345)
Engine: 1.6-litre turbo diesel
Power: 
115 hp
Torque: 280 Nm
0-100km/h:  
11.4 seconds
Top speed: 190 km/h
Fuel consumption (NEDC2): 
4.1 – 4.3 l/100km
CO2 emissions (NEDC2):  
109-114 g/km
Motor Tax: €200 per year


The new Mazda3 Skyactiv-X

Mazda3 Skyactiv-X (2020) Review

The new Mazda3 Skyactiv-X
The new Mazda3 Skyactiv-X

Caroline drives the new Mazda3 Skyactiv-X.

Mazda has been working behind the scenes on a multi-solution approach to the decarbonisation of transport. While the brand will launch their first electric vehicle, the MX-30, towards the end of 2020, they have certainly not given up on the internal combustion engine. In fact, Mazda is very much committed to improving the efficiency of the internal combustion engine with innovative engineering that will continue to meet the transport demands of many people whose circumstances just don’t match electric vehicles right now.

One of the brand’s most astounding innovations has been the introduction of the Skyactiv-X petrol engine. It is billed as a revolutionary engine, the world’s first engine to use spark controlled compression ignition combining the spark ignition of a petrol with the compression ignition of a diesel. The brand promises more power, performance and efficiency. It was time to take a test drive in the new Mazda3 Skyactiv-X to get to grips with this new engine and test the claims Mazda makes about it.

To recap, Mazda launched a new generation of the Mazda3 in Ireland in 2019. Along with the launch of the brand’s new CX-30 compact SUV, these models spearhead a new generation of Mazda vehicles built on a new platform. Mazda’s famous KODO design language evolves for even more refined surfacing and showstopper looks. Note the magic in the curvature of the metal of the new Mazda3’s C pillar.

Inside the new Mazda3

The interior of the new Mazda3
The interior of the new Mazda3

The premium design continues to the inside of the vehicle. Here the interior of the Mazda3 has matured again. It’s plush, sporty and well-appointed with the latest technology features and infotainment. All models feature a seven-inch colour TFT driver instrument display and the latest version of the Mazda Connect infotainment system. My test car was a beautiful GT Sport with burgundy leather. This interior finish really springs the Mazda3 into the company of premium hatchbacks like the BMW 1 Series, Audi A3 and the Mercedes-Benz A-Class.

Inside the Mazda3 will seat five, but some rivals do rear seating space better. At 351 litres, the boot is about average for the compact class. A Mazda3 saloon is also available with a bigger boot at 444 litres.

Now Mazda has expanded the engine range to include the 2.0-litre, four cylinder Skyactiv-X with 180 hp and 224 Nm of torque. This new engine joins the 2.0 Skyactiv-G petrol (122hp) and the 1.8 Skyactiv-D diesel (116hp). Manual and automatic gearboxes are available.

Skyactiv-X offers more power in the Mazda3
Skyactiv-X offers more power in the Mazda3

So what about Skyactiv-X?

When we reviewed the Mazda3 Skyactiv-G back in 2019, we noted that at times this naturally aspirated engine could feel a bit lazy as we’re used to driving turbocharged engines in cars like this from other manufacturers. Now Mazda gives us Skyactiv-X. They’ve squeezed out more horsepower and it feels more lively on the road, though it’s still far from a hot hatchback. But the extra flexibility is welcome. And the good news is that this extra power hasn’t come at a cost to efficiency. The Mazda3 Skyactiv-X actually falls into a lower motor tax band than the Skyactiv-G and over a week of driving my fuel consumption was the same – 6.6l/100km.

This is not the diesel-like economy Mazda promised with this engine. And some refinement has been lost with Skyactiv-X with more diesel-like noise in certain scenarios. But by and large this is a very pleasant car to spend time with, and certainly in this spec it feels like a true range topper. The Mazda3 is poised on the road, smooth and engaging to drive.

This new engine technology does carry a premium with the Skyactiv-X range starting from €31,920. For example, the Mazda3 Skyactiv-X GT Sport on test has a list price of €35,420, putting it well into the territory of premium hatchbacks. Lucky that the Mazda3 is so well designed and appointed that it can sit very comfortably in this company.

Mazda3 Skyactiv-X available from €31,920
Mazda3 Skyactiv-X available from €31,920

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Mazda3 2.0 Skyactiv-X Petrol 180 ps 6 Speed Manual Transmission 2WD 
Price: 
€35,420
Engine: 2.0-litre petrol
Power: 
180 hp
Torque: 224 Nm
0-100km/h:  
8.2 seconds
Top speed: 216 km/h
Fuel consumption (WLTP): 
5.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions (WLTP)/NEDC2:  
131g/km/103g/km
Motor Tax: €190 per year


The new LEAF 62 kWh has more range than ever before!

2020 Nissan LEAF 62 kWh Review

Caroline drives the 2020 Nissan LEAF 62 kWh.

The Nissan LEAF is one of Ireland’s most popular electric cars and a pioneer of mainstream electric motoring. Within the last year the number of electric vehicles available in Ireland has expanded and the LEAF has been under attack from some new rivals. However the high visibility of the LEAF in Ireland, all generations, is undeniable, and you are definitely likely to encounter one at your local EV charger. The LEAF has clearly penetrated the market here very well.

In 2018, Nissan launched an all-new LEAF hatchback with a 40 kWh battery with more power and a range in the region of 250 km. The car had evolved into something more desirable with modern design technology and safety features. In 2019, the LEAF got even better with the launch of the new longer range Nissan LEAF 62 kWh.

What's new for the 2020 Nissan LEAF?

Priced in Ireland from €37,840, the 62 kWh LEAF crucially has a 25% increase in energy density and 55% boost in energy storage capacity, giving the 62 kWh LEAF a power output of 217 PS and up to 385 km (WLTP) on a single charge compared to the 40 kWh Nissan LEAF. I tested the car in the cold weather of November and with 98% battery power when I picked it up, the range read about 340 km.

The new LEAF 62 kWh has more range than ever before!
The new LEAF 62 kWh has more range than ever before!

Other new features for the LEAF 62 kWh include the new NissanConnect infotainment system as standard, with Apple CarPlay® and AndroidAuto® for seamless smartphone connectivity. An upgraded navigation system also shows live traffic and nearby chargers. There’s also a new NissanConnect Services app that allows users to send navigation routes and preset air conditioning or heating.

Nissan so far has ignored the electric crossover/SUV trend and the LEAF remains a classic hatchback with the latest Nissan family face. The new battery retains a similar shape and size to the 40 kWh LEAF battery pack, so there is no detriment to interior space in this upgraded model. Interior accommodation is about average for a hatchback of this size and the boot is a very good size. There are special places to store the cables so the practicality of the space is not negatively impacted.

The interior of the LEAF

Inside, the LEAF 62 kWh has the same dash design as the new generation LEAF we tested in 2018. There is some new digital technology however already the graphics on the driver information panel and infotainment screen are looking a little dated. Still, functionality is okay and it's handy to be able to find nearby charging stations. You also sit a little higher in the LEAF than a standard hatchback because of the battery under the floor.

The interior of the new Nissan LEAF
The interior of the new Nissan LEAF

In Ireland, the new 62 kWh Nissan LEAF starts from €37,840 in SV grade with a high specification including Intelligent Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Recognition, Intelligent Trace Control, Moving Object Detection, Intelligent Lane Intervention, e-Pedal with regenerative function, front and rear parking sensors, Around View Monitor, 17″ alloy wheels, privacy glass, LED daytime running lights and LED rear signature lights.

The range-topping SVE 62 kWh LEAF is available from €40,500 and includes ProPilot, Bose Audio System, Intelligent Auto LED headlights, heated leather steering wheel and leather heated seats front and rear.

Driving the Nissan Leaf 62 kWh

On the road, the Nissan LEAF is nippy with 217 hp at its disposal. It handles well through corners and is smooth, refined and of course, quiet, on the move.

The extra range of this 62 kWh model is very welcome. The CHAdeMO type rapid charger is 50kW / 100kW compatible and will get you from 20% to 80% charge in about 90 minutes (50kW). Charging at home takes about 12 hours.

The new LEAF 62 kWh is still eclipsed by some rivals like the Kia e-Soul in terms of the range and how far it will go on one charge.

The Nissan LEAF is the original mass market electric vehicle, famed for its accessibility and affordable entry into electric motoring.

However, the new LEAF 62 kWh requires considerable investment and in range alone, there are some better competitors in this space.

LEAF buyers now have more options. Not everyone wants a crossover or SUV. Hatchback lovers still exist. The game is moving rapidly for EVs. The LEAF 62 kWh keeps up for now.

LEAF 62 kWh available from €37,840
LEAF 62 kWh available from €37,840

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Nissan LEAF 62 kWh SVE
Price:
€40,500
Battery: 62 kWh
Power: 
217 hp
Torque:  340 Nm
0-100km/h: 
6.9 seconds
Top speed: 158 km/h 
Range (WLTP):
385 km
Motor tax: 
€120 per year


Caroline and the new Ford Focus Active!

Ford Focus Active Review (2019)

Caroline and the new Ford Focus Active!
Caroline and the new Ford Focus Active!

Caroline drives the new Ford Focus Active!

Ford has expanded the Focus range in Ireland with the arrival of the new Focus Active. Priced from €25,344, the Focus Active aims to bring crossover style to the compact class.

To that end, the Focus has been raised by 13 mm and styling has been tweaked for a more rugged look – grey skid plate front and rear, roof rails, new plastic cladding, dark grille with unique mesh pattern and special alloy wheel designs.

Inside, the Focus Active has unique seat upholstery, new trims and 'Active' scuff plates. The Active version also has two new drive modes, perfectly tuned for adventure – ‘Slippery’ and ‘Trail’!

The Ford Focus Active hatchback is crossover inspired
The Ford Focus Active hatchback is crossover inspired

What are my options?

In Ireland the Focus Active is available as a hatchback or estate (from €26,414) and engines include Ford’s acclaimed 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engine and 1.5-litre TDCi diesel. My test car was a Ford Focus Active 1.5 TDCi with a 6-speed manual gearbox, priced from €27,353.

Standard equipment includes 17" 5-spoke two tone painted aluminium wheels, pre-collision assist, electronic parking brake, keyless start, LED daytime running lights, front fog lights with cornering lights, air con, cruise control, radio with 8" touchscreen display with DAB, Ford SYNC 3 with Voice Control, plus Bluetooth® and USB connectivity, navigation and six speakers.

Visually the the new Focus Active does carry a strong appearance and image thanks to the styling tweaks and slightly raised ride height. However, unfortunately this character hasn't found its way much into the interior of the car. It's rather plain inside. Changes are negligible though the Focus has a fine cabin with the latest technology features and seamless integration with smartphones. The car is nicely sized and accommodating, having improved interior space over the previous generation of the Focus.

The interior of the new Ford Focus Active
The interior of the new Ford Focus Active

Driving the new Ford Focus Active

Ford has modified the chassis of the Focus Active with unique springs, dampers, stabiliser bars, and front and rear knuckle geometries, to account for the raised ride height of the vehicle. On the road, the Focus Active still feels like a Focus though it's not quite as sharp with a less sporty, hunkered down feel through corners. Still it's athletic and good to drive - comfortable and smooth on the motorway, compact and agile around town. The 1.5-litre diesel performs well with 120 hp providing adequate rather than blistering power. Over a week of driving my fuel consumption averaged at an economical 5.1 l/100km.

Ford has also added a little more capability for adventurous souls. In addition to the Normal, Sport and Eco Selectable Drive Modes equipped as standard on all Focus models, the Focus Active now introduces Slippery mode, which adjusts ESC and traction control settings for increased confidence on surfaces with reduced grip such as mud, snow and ice. There's also a new Trail mode, which helps maintain momentum on soft surfaces such as sand.

The Ford Focus range now offers a number of different ‘flavours’, like the classic Titanium, the sporty ST-line and now the outdoorsy Active.

The crossover makeover has worked very well on the new Fiesta Active, with a great presence and spec at good value pricing.

However, for the Focus it has sacrificed a little of its sporty edge in the process. No surprises then that the ST-Line is still my favourite Focus!

The car follows market trends with crossover-inspired styling. In this regard, the Active makeover departs a different look for the Focus that is bound to garner it a few fans.

The Focus Active is available from €25,344
The Focus Active is available from €25,344

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Ford Focus Active 1.5 TDCi
Price:
€27,353 (Range from €23,364)
Engine: 1.5-litre turbo diesel
Power: 
120 hp
Torque: 300 Nm
0-100km/h: 
10 seconds
Top speed: 196 km/h
Fuel economy (WLTP):
4.5-4.9 l/100km
CO2 emissions:
93 g/km
Motor tax: 
€180 per year

 


The new Mercedes-Benz CLA!

2019 Mercedes-Benz CLA180 Petrol Review

The new Mercedes-Benz CLA!
The new Mercedes-Benz CLA!

Caroline drives the 2019 Mercedes-Benz CLA!

The new Mercedes-Benz CLA is yet another addition to Mercedes-Benz recently updated line of compact cars. A spin-off of the new A-Class, the CLA is a stylish and prestigious four door coupé priced from €34,110 in Ireland.

The new CLA drips with style and kerb appeal. While Mercedes has also recently launched a new A-Class saloon, the CLA is an altogether more elegant looking car. To accommodate the new A-Class saloon, the CLA has moved up a gear to occupy a more salubrious position.

Despite relatively compact dimensions, it has presence and yeah, it looks expensive! The designers have done a wonderful job with the proportions and features like the frameless doors give it exclusivity.

The interior of the new CLA
The interior of the new CLA

The fantastic interior of the new CLA

Inside the CLA carries the latest Benz interior, which is a very good thing. According to Mercedes-Benz, all elements are arranged according to the themes of ‘high tech’ and ‘youthful avant-garde’. Sounds good to me. It follows the dashboard theme of the A-Class but with some more stylish mods. There is a sportier and even more sophisticated vibe.

My AMG Line test car had a dual tone colour scheme of black and beige with sporty seats all round. There is excellent technology at your fingertips with the MBUX infotainment system and the widescreen display is completely free-standing. crystal-clear digital screens. It all works together very well. Mercedes is totally winning at compact premium car interiors right now.

The new CLA is available in three trim lines: Style, Progressive and AMG Line. Standard equipment includes active lane keeping assist, cruise control, heated front seats, keyless go, leather multifuction steering wheel, MBUX multimedia system, 7” screen, reversing camera, auto lights and wipers, climate control and 16” alloys. My AMG Line test car had aluminium pedals, sports seats, leather, 18” alloys, and AMG bodystyling for the ultimate sporty look.

The new platform beneath the CLA has stretched out more space making it a better buy and interior space is okay for four adults. The boot is 460 litres and practical enough for this type of car. A slightly more practical CLA ‘shooting brake’ is available from €35,930.

The 2019 Mercedes-Benz CLA sits on a new platform and is bigger inside
The 2019 Mercedes-Benz CLA sits on a new platform and is bigger inside

The new CLA is available with a range of petrol and diesel engines. The bestselling model in Ireland is expected to be a CLA180 petrol version priced from €34,110 and a CLA180d automatic version priced from €37,300.

Driving the 2019 Mercedes-Benz CLA

My test car was a CLA180 with a 1.3-litre turbo petrol engine putting out 136hp. This engine is also available with 163hp (CLA200) and other derivatives include CLA 220, 250, 200d, and 220d. For a small capacity engine it is very impressive and is more than capable of the job in the CLA. It doesn’t get too noisy and it works well with the 7-speed automatic gearbox. Over a week of driving my average fuel consumption was 6.2 l/100km.

A wider track and a lower centre of gravity are the two key features that give the CLA the sportiest driving characteristics of all models in the new generation of compacts from Mercedes-Benz. The technical specification includes a decoupled multi-link axle at the rear for reduced noise and vibration, a Direct-Steer system as standard and hydromounts at the front. A stabiliser bar with a larger diameter reduces body roll. An active adaptive damping system is available, giving the driver the choice between comfort or a more uncompromising sporty tuning. The ESP® has been specially adapted to the CLA’s potentially high cornering speeds and handling performance.

On the road the CLA is agile and sporty to drive. The A-Class pedigree is good anyway but the modifications make it even more enjoyable, though the ride can be a bit more harsh over rough surfaces.

Would you buy it?

The Mercedes-Benz CLA is a highly desirable car with drop dead gorgeous looks, high quality cabin and fun driving character. You do pay a premium for the sexy coupe design and prestige of this model and it’s not really any bigger or more practical than an A-Class. But it is oh so seductive and fun to drive. Easy to recommend if you are looking for something a little bit special in this price range.

The CLA is available from €34,110
The CLA is available from €34,110

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Mercedes-Benz CLA180 Coupe
Price:
€40,527 (Range from €34,110)
Engine: 1.3-litre turbo petrol
Power: 
136 hp
Torque: 200 Nm
0-100km/h: 
9 seconds
Top speed: 216 km/h
Fuel economy (WLTP):
5.4-5.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions (WLTP): 
123 g/km
Motor tax: 
€270 per year