The new Hyundai Santa Fe on test for Changing Lanes

Hyundai Santa Fe Hybrid Review (2022)

Read Caroline's Hyundai Santa Fe review for everything you need to know about buying Hyundai's flagship SUV in Ireland in 2022.

In 2021, Hyundai launched a new version of the popular Santa Fe seven seat SUV in Ireland.

The big news for the launch of this new model is the arrival of a new plug-in hybrid to the Santa Fe range.

With pricing starting from €56,445, the Hyundai Santa Fe plug-in hybrid is now the entry into the Santa Fe range. The Premium trim version with more equipment is available from €60,445.

Hyundai will also sell you a diesel Santa Fe from €64,895, with diesel four wheel drive models priced from €69,995.

The new Hyundai Santa Fe on test for Changing Lanes
The new Hyundai Santa Fe on test for Changing Lanes

What's so special about the Hyundai Santa Fe?

The Hyundai Santa Fe is following the move in the industry towards electrification. Hyundai's largest SUV is now available for the very first time as a plug-in hybrid on the Irish market.

But for drivers where diesel still makes a lot of sense, that's available in the range too.

All models for the Irish market come with 7 seats.

The big Hyundai has had some work done beyond powertrain in the latest series of improvements. Everything has been done with the aim of making this popular SUV more premium.

The profile and rear remain almost identical to the generation of the Santa Fe that launched in 2018. But the front end has a new look that is more bold and distinctive than what has come before.

At the rear, there's a new taillight design and a red reflector band has been added to connect the taillights. The rear bumper has also been gently reshaped for a more sophisticated design. The car looks great, with a substantial presence for a flagship SUV.

19" alloy wheels, roof rails and chrome door handles come as standard for the Santa Fe plug-in hybrid.

Hyundai has revamped the Santa Fe to make it more premium
Hyundai has revamped the Santa Fe to make it more premium

Inside the Santa Fe

Inside, the interior of the 2022 Hyundai Santa Fe has also been significantly updated for a more premium feel.

It works well. There's a new lower dashboard design, a redesigned centre console and a new 10.25-inch touchscreen. There are new shift-by-wire buttons for the automatic transmission. For the first time, the new Santa Fe comes with a Terrain Mode selector in the centre console to switch between different drive modes. There's also a new 12.3-inch fully digital cluster for the driver.

Leather upholstery, parking camera, wireless phone charging, heated steering wheel and heated seats come as standard. The Premium model gets a powered tailgate, around view monitor and panoramic glass roof.

All cars come with a suite of safety equipment including adaptive cruise control and lane follow assist.

In terms of practicality, the Santa Fe has seating for seven, with two extra seats in the third row. The battery pack for the hybrid is positioned beneath the driver and passenger seats, with no impact on cabin or boot space.

As a result of the platform update, the new Santa Fe has 3 cm more leg room in the second row. While there is 4 cm more leg room for passengers in third row. Boot capacity has been increased too, with a total of 571 litres in 5 seat mode.

The cabin is huge, with plenty of headroom and legroom in the second row. The seats in the third row are ideal for children and can be folded down and stored neatly when not in use.

The interior of the new Santa Fe
The interior of the new Santa Fe

Driving the Hyundai Santa Fe Hybrid

The new Santa Fe is the first Hyundai model in Europe to be based on the brand's new, third-generation vehicle platform. The new platform allows for significant improvements in performance, handling, efficiency and safety for the latest version of the Santa Fe.

Steering has been altered for more agile handling. Noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) performance is improved through reinforced sound-absorbing systems in vibration-sensitive parts of the body.

On the road the Santa Fe is every inch the premium SUV with a smooth and refined drive, no matter the road surface. It handles well for a large SUV, with great visibility all round.

The Santa Fe plug-in hybrid uses a 1.6-litre T-GDi ‘Smartstream’ petrol engine paired with a 66.9 kW electric motor drawing its power from a 13.8 kWh battery. It's available with four-wheel drive and the total power output is 265 PS, while combined torque is 350 Nm. It's paired to a newly-developed 6-speed automatic transmission.

Plug-in hybrid happens to suit the Santa Fe very well, with plenty of power available and a serene cabin experience. This model has the advantage of allowing you to charge the Santa Fe at home for example, and then drive it electric for a range of up to 58 km. This is ideal for drivers who have a short commute perhaps or spend a lot of time driving in and out of town.

Over a week of driving my average fuel consumption was 6.8 litres per 100 km, so with regular charging the Santa Fe will really come into its own.

Rear legroom in the Santa Fe
Rear legroom in the Santa Fe

Did you like it?

Hyundai brings the Santa Fe into the big time.The Hyundai Santa Fe is a salubrious and well-kitted out car that feels like a flagship from behind the wheel.

With a well-appointed cabin featuring the latest digital technology features, Hyundai delivers on its ambition to move Santa Fe upmarket. The new interior design is a big improvement over the previous version of the Santa Fe.

Large family seven seat SUVs like this one don't come cheap, but in return the Santa Fe offers fabulous interior space and practicality.

Interestingly the petrol plug in hybrid is now the most affordable entry into the Santa Fe range. With four wheel drive and a healthy power output, it's a feasible alternative to a diesel SUV.

On the road the Santa Fe is smooth and refined, with the hybrid adding a serene quality to this car. For urban drivers, it's a large SUV with a conscience, running happily on electric power for a range that is ideal to exploit in low speed driving situations around town for example.

The brand is on a roll here with the new generation Tucson still Ireland's bestselling car so far this year and the Hyundai IONIQ 5 the bestselling electric car. With seating for seven, the Santa Fe offers even more flexibility in a hotly contested segment of the market.

The Santa Fe seven seat SUV is on sale now
The Hyundai Santa Fe seven seat SUV is on sale now

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Hyundai Santa Fe Plug-in Hybrid Executive Plus Auto 4WD
Price:
€56,445
Engine: 1.6-litre petrol electric hybrid
Power:
261 hp
Torque: 350 Nm
0-100km/h:  
8.8 seconds
Top speed: 187 km/h
CO2 emissions:
37 g/km
Motor tax: 
€140 per year


The new Hyundai IONIQ 5 on test for Changing Lanes!

Hyundai IONIQ 5 Review (2022)

Read Caroline's latest Hyundai IONIQ 5 review for everything you need to know about Hyundai's exciting new electric car in Ireland in 2022.

The Hyundai IONIQ 5, the first model from Hyundai’s new IONIQ electric vehicle-exclusive brand, arrived in Ireland in 2021. The IONIQ 5 goes on sale priced from €37,995, with two batteries available - a 58 kWh with up to 384 km of range and a 72 kWh with up to 481 km of range (WLTP).

With striking good looks, revolutionary Hyundai interior, long range and fast charging, the IONIQ 5 makes a dramatic debut!

The new Hyundai IONIQ 5 on test for Changing Lanes!
The new Hyundai IONIQ 5 on test for Changing Lanes!

Hyundai as a brand has an impressive pedigree in electric vehicles already with the Hyundai Kona Electric being one of Ireland's most popular compact electric vehicles. The small crossover was a game changer when it arrived in Ireland at the end of 2018, with an electric range in excess of 400 km.

Since then the electric vehicle market has got even more competitive, but Hyundai strikes back with the launch of the IONIQ 5. It's a larger car than the Kona Electric. In fact the space inside is more comparable with the Hyundai Santa Fe, Hyundai's large family SUV. Let's take a closer look.

What's so special about the Hyundai IONIQ 5?

The IONIQ 5 marks a new direction for Hyundai in design. It is built on Hyundai Motor Company’s dedicated battery electric vehicle architecture called Electric-Global Modular Platform (E-GMP), which allows it to have unique proportions on an elongated wheelbase.

The IONIQ 5 looks like a concept car. It's a fresh new look for the Hyundai brand, with a futuristic presence on the road. The front of the car has Hyundai’s first clam shell bonnet that minimises panel gaps for the best aerodynamics.

The Hyundai IONIQ 5 is very striking and interesting to look at
The Hyundai IONIQ 5 is very striking and interesting to look at

The front bumper has an eye-catching V-shape incorporating distinctive daytime running lights that provide an unmistakable light signature unique to IONIQ 5. Small pixel-like light clusters also appear at the rear of the vehicle. Auto flush door handles provide clean surface styling and enhanced aerodynamic efficiency. It's a beautiful car that really makes a statement.

Inside, the IONIQ 5 has a lounge-like feel. The dedicated electric vehicle platform has allowed for an innovative use of space inside the vehicle. There's great width to the cabin and loads of space beneath the dashboard and where a centre console traditionally lies.

It's a new interior design concept for Hyundai - futuristic but functional. Yet it's easy to get comfortable in here. The controls are all intuitive to use. The quality is worth a mention too. It's truly excellent. Everything feels good to touch from the dials and switches, to the inside surfaces of the doors.

Digital technology is on point as you would expect from a trendsetter like the IONIQ 5. Two 12.3” LCD screens give an almost widescreen effect - one for the driver information display and one for multimedia. There's also wireless phone charging for compatible devices, a rear view camera and smart navigation-based cruise control.

Inside the new Hyundai IONIQ 5
Inside the new Hyundai IONIQ 5

Is it practical?

Hyundai pitches the IONIQ 5 between the Tucson and Santa Fe in size. In fact space inside is more comparable to the Santa Fe. There's loads of room in the front of the cabin.

Hyundai has reduced the thickness of the front seats by 30 percent, providing more space for those seated in the second row. You can also recline almost flat in those front seats!

Rear leg room is really excellent because of the stretched wheelbase. The rear seats split fold 60:40 and also slide as standard. There's a flat floor too making it more comfortable for a middle passenger.

The boot has over 500 litres of space and a traditional hatchback-style opening. There's also a handy space under the boot floor to store charging cables away cleanly. There is a small amount of extra storage under the bonnet too.

What's available in the IONIQ 5 range in Ireland?

In Ireland there is a choice of three battery and drive types for IONIQ 5: a 58 kWh, single motor, rear wheel drive; a 72 kWh, single motor, rear wheel drive; or a 72 kWh dual motor all-wheel drive model.

The 58 kWh model on test for Changing Lanes is single motor and sends 170 hp to the rear wheels. There's 350 Nm of torque available, with 0 to 100 km/h achieved in 8.5 seconds. The electric range of this model is up to 384 km (WLTP) and it's priced from €37,995, including all relevant grants and reductions.

The 72 kWh, single motor IONIQ 5 starts from €44,995. The same car with all wheel drive is available from €64,995 with the best performance of the entire range - 0 to 100 km/h in just 5.2 seconds.

There are four trim levels in Ireland: Executive, Executive Plus, Premium and Premium Plus, with high levels of equipment across the range. Standard equipment includes 19” alloy wheels, interior mood lighting, 12.3” LCD audio, visual and navigation system with DAB, Apple Car Play™ and Android Auto™, LCD drivers instrument cluster, and wireless phone charging for compatible devices. There's also a rear view camera, LED Multi-Faceted Reflector headlamps, LED stop, tail and turn lamps, rear parking sensors. Highway Drive Assist, Intelligent Speed Limit Assist, and Lane Keep Assist with Lane Following Assist.

Charging the Hyundai IONIQ 5
Charging the Hyundai IONIQ 5

Driving and charging the Hyundai IONIQ 5

On the road, the Hyundai IONIQ 5 58 kWh is swift and supple. There's a natural feeling to this car on the road that is very pleasant; it doesn't feel too heavy. It's not designed to be sporty but it is still agile and well-balanced through corners.

The transmission is very refined. The IONIQ 5 is quiet and comfortable on the move with little transmission noise entering the cabin. It's capable of driving long distances on one charge, while being comfortable too for an electric car with a balanced ride quality.

IONIQ 5 features 800V charging as standard, which makes it one of the best EVs on the market right now for charging. Of course this depends on the infrastructure available to you but the IONIQ 5 has a lot of things in its favour. If you can find an IONITY station, you can charge at the IONIQ 5's maximum charging rate of 220 kW, and get 80% battery charge in just 20 minutes.

There is also a powerful 11 kW on-board charger with more flexibility for AC charging. It allows the IONIQ 5 to charge almost twice as fast as a lot of other EVs on the market using those 22 kW public chargers in Irish cities and towns.

WATCH MY VIDEO OF THE NEW IONIQ5 !

Did you like it?

Hyundai has already proven itself as a front runner in the race to electric with the launch of the Kona Electric back in 2018 and its stellar electric range for a sub-premium compact.

But IONIQ 5 brings the game on again for the Korean car brand. The IONIQ 5 feels fresh, new and a generation ahead with its innovative design and 800V fast charging capabilities.

The 11kW on board charger brings even more flexibility in AC charging and is a great feature to have as standard.

It's no doubt an unusual car, more a hatchback than an SUV. Though the raised ride height will make it popular among drivers seeking a more crossover-style vehicle.

The IONIQ 5 deserves to draw attention to itself with its futuristic design, considering what Hyundai has packed into this car. All things considered, the IONIQ 5 58 kWh is well-priced, loaded with equipment and technology, and a sound buy. The 72 kWh version will bring even more comfort when it comes to range, with over 400 km available on a full battery charge.

The new Hyundai IONIQ 5 is just one more reason why electric is closer than you think.

The Hyundai IONIQ 5 on sale now from €37,995
The Hyundai IONIQ 5 on sale now from €37,995

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Hyundai IONIQ 5 58 kWh Premium
Price:
€44,995
Battery: 58 kWh
Power: 
170 hp
Torque: 350 Nm
0-100km/h:
8.5 seconds
Top speed: 185 km/h
Motor tax: 
€120 per year


The new Hyundai Bayon!

Hyundai Bayon Review (2022)

The new Hyundai Bayon!
The new Hyundai Bayon!

Hyundai broadens the appeal of the brand's small car line-up with the arrival of the new Hyundai Bayon in 2021.

It has been designed for Europe and has been given a European name to reflect that – Bayon is inspired by ‘Bayonne’, the capital of the French Basque Country. With on-trend crossover styling, it is now the most compact of Hyundai’s SUV family – joining the popular Kona, Tucson and Santa Fe.

Responding to trends in the market for crossover-style vehicles, the brand launched the Kona compact crossover in Ireland back in 2017 and it has been a great success with electric, hybrid and petrol variants, starting from €24,395. Hyundai now has a young range of compact cars with the new Hyundai i10 and Hyundai i20 on sale here since just 2020.

Where does the Bayon sit in the Hyundai range?

The Bayon now slips in to the Hyundai range just below the Kona, offering a more crossover-inspired design to traditional small cars like the i10 and the i20, with an attractive entry price of €20,795.

New Bayon on sale in Ireland from €20,795
New Bayon on sale in Ireland from €20,795

Though based on the i20 supermini, the Bayon looks like a more substantial car in the metal with a slightly raised ride height and some characteristic new generation Hyundai design cues like slim headlights and arrow-shaped lights at the rear. It's longer and higher than an i20 with roof rails giving the required injection of attitude for the urban crossover.

Keeping things simple is the order of the day with just petrol power for the new Bayon -  a choice of a 1.2-litre petrol manual or a 1.0-litre automatic. There are two trim levels - Comfort Plus and Executive - with a two tone roof option available for Executive models.

Inside the Hyundai Bayon

Inside the Bayon has a simple cabin design that's easy to navigate. There is lots of hard plastic but at this price that goes with the territory and it feels solid and well made throughout. Simple and functional, drivers will enjoy a slightly elevated ride height behind the wheel.

The instrument cluster is fully digital (10.25") while Executive models (from €22,795) come with an 8" touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

The interior of the new Bayon
The interior of the new Bayon

The interior of the new Bayon has been designed to be clean, roomy, and well-lit with ambient lighting available as standard on Executive models. This is a small car but there is a good use of space inside the vehicle with rear legroom and headroom decent for a compact. There has been a focus on maximising front and rear passenger comfort and increasing boot space, with 411 litres available, excellent for a car of this size.

Standard equipment includes roof rails, air con and Bluetooth, while the Executive model adds 16″ alloys, heated from seats, automatic air con, 8″ touchscreen, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, wireless phone charger and digital instrument panel.

In Ireland, the new Bayon launched with a 1.2-litre petrol engine with 84 hp and a 5-speed manual gearbox. Motor tax is €200 per year for the Bayon 1.2 manual. The 1.0-litre automatic joins the range in time for January 2022. Motor tax is €210 per year for the Bayon 1.0 automatic.

The Bayon is the smallest crossover in Hyundai's range
The Bayon is the smallest crossover in Hyundai's range

Driving the Bayon

On the road the Bayon feels light and easy to drive. It provides comfort for passengers over a variety of roads and road surfaces.

The 1.2-litre engine is a simple naturally aspirated affair with 84 hp, while 0 to 100 km/h is 13.5 seconds. This makes it ideal for driving around town where it is smooth and free-revving.

The Bayon feels less at home out on larger roads where the revs run high at cruising speeds on the motorway. It is a four cylinder engine so the refinement is good inside the vehicle with not too much intrusive engine noise. It is a cheap car to run. My fuel consumption averaged at about 5.3 litres per 100 km during my time with the car.

Rear seating in the Hyundai Bayon
Rear seating in the Hyundai Bayon

Did you like it?

Hyundai has had a busy year with a number of new product launches including a facelifted Hyundai Kona, new Tucson and Santa Fe. There was also the arrival of the all-electric IONIQ 5.

New Bayon strengthens the compact portfolio while meeting consumer demand for more crossover-inspired vehicles.

The Bayon surprises with its practicality and comfort. It is a simple and straightforward motoring experience in these days where everything seems to be either hybrid or electric.

While those needs are catered for elsewhere in the Hyundai range, the Bayon offers a practical and comfortable small car at just over €20,000. Executive models offer the full digital experience, with even wireless smartphone charging included.

Cheap to run, Bayon is an ideal city car with a little more crossover style!

The Bayon is an ideal city car with a little crossover style
The Bayon is an ideal city car with a little crossover style

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Hyundai Bayon Executive
Price: 
€22,795
Engine: 
1.2-litre petrol
Power:  84 hp
Torque: 118 Nm
Top speed: 165 km/h
Acceleration (0-100 km/h): 13.5 seconds
CO2 emissions:
 128 g/km
Motor Tax: 
€200 per year


The new Hyundai Bayon on sale in Ireland now

Hyundai Bayon Pricing For Ireland

The new Hyundai Bayon on sale in Ireland now
The new Hyundai Bayon on sale in Ireland now

The Hyundai Bayon has arrived in Ireland and goes on sale priced from €21,645 rising to €24,245.

It has been designed for Europe and has been given a European name to reflect that - Bayon is inspired by 'Bayonne', the capital of the French Basque Country.

With on-trend crossover styling, it is now the most compact of Hyundai's SUV family - joining the Kona, Tucson and Santa Fe. Bayon is the latest model from Hyundai to showcase the brand's “Sensuous Sportiness” design identity, with strong lines, slim headlights and arrow-shaped lights at the rear.

In Ireland the new Bayon goes on sale with a 1.2-litre petrol engine with 84 hp. It's available from launch with a 5-speed manual gearbox, with an automatic to join the range in January 2022. Motor tax is €200 per year for the Bayon 1.2 manual.

The interior of the new Bayon has been designed to be clean, roomy, and well-lit with ambient lighting available as standard on Executive models, which also get the full digital look with touchscreen and 10.25-inch digital cluster for the driver.

There has been a focus on maximising front and rear passenger comfort and increasing boot space, with 411 litres available.

New Bayon goes on sale in Ireland in two trim levels - Comfort Plus and Executive - with a two tone roof option available on the Executive model.

Standard equipment includes roof rails, air con and Bluetooth, while the Executive model (from €23,645) adds 16" alloys, heated from seats, automatic air con, 8" touchscreen, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, wireless phone charger and digital instrument panel.

The launch of the new Bayon means Hyundai has now launched or enhanced seven new models in just 12 months.

The Bayon is in Hyundai dealers around Ireland now.

The interior of the new Bayon
The interior of the new Bayon

The new Hyundai Tuscon on test for Changing Lanes!

New Car Registrations For Ireland April 2021

The new Hyundai Tuscon on test for Changing Lanes!
The new Hyundai Tuscon continues to sell well in Ireland

The Society of the Irish Motor Industry has released the latest vehicle registration data for Ireland in April 2021.

7,166 new cars were registered for the month of April compared to 343 in April 2020 and 8,904 in April 2019.

55,207 new cars have been registered year to date compared to 50,138 for the same period in 2020 (+10.11) and 73,030 in 2019 (-24.41%).

For the month of April, 596 new electric vehicles were registered. So far this year 3,414 new electric cars have been registered in Ireland.

Electric Vehicle, Plug-in Hybrids and Hybrids continue to increase their market share, with their combined market share now over 22.61%. Diesel now accounts for 36.86%, Petrol 32.06%, Hybrid 16.66%, Electric 6.18% and Plug-in Electric Hybrid 5.95%

The top five bestselling car brands in April were: 1.Toyota, 2.Volkswagen, 3.Hyundai, 4. Skoda and 5. Ford. The bestelling car models were 1.Hyundai Tucson, 2.Toyota Corolla, 3.Toyota RAV 4, 4. Ford Focus and 5.Volkswagen Tiguan.

The bestselling car in Ireland in April was the Hyundai Tucson.

Light Commercials Vehicles (LCV) saw an increase of 2,385 registrations compared to April last year 231 and 1,798 for the same month in 2019. Year to date 13,722 new LCVs were registered an increase on last year’s 9,500 (+44.4%) and 12,853 on 2019 (+6.67%).

Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGV) saw 325 registrations in April when compared to 96 in April 2020 and 305 April 2019. Year to date HGV's registrations total 1,223 compared with 1,004 in 2020 (+21.81%) and 1,189 in 2019 (+2.86%).

5,676 used cars were imported in April 2021, compared with 200 imports in April 2020, a decrease on the 8,887 imports in April 2019. Year to date used imports are up 36.4% (24,095) on 2020 (17,666) and down 32.54% on 2019 (35,719).

Brian Cooke, SIMI Director General commenting:
“While new cars sales to the end of April have now overtaken sales for the same period last year, they are still over 24% behind pre-COVID 2019. The investment in on-line selling platforms over the last year and the ability to offer a click and deliver service to car buyers has been a lifeline to the Industry during this difficult time. The phased re-opening of showrooms announced by Government last week has been welcomed by the Industry, and retailers are cautiously optimistic about car sales, both new and used, in the weeks and months ahead. It is hoped that pent up demand allied with the increase in personal savings will see customers returning to showrooms. It should be underlined that car retailing operates in large open spaces, and with low footfall and the ability to social distance well beyond the recommended two metres, showrooms are a safe environment for customers.”.


The new Hyundai Tuscon on test for Changing Lanes!

Hyundai Tucson Review (2022)

The new Hyundai Tuscon on test for Changing Lanes!
The new Hyundai Tucson on test for Changing Lanes!

Read Caroline's Hyundai Tucson review for everything you need to know about Hyundai's latest generation of the popular Tucson SUV, no available as a hybrid and Tucson plug-in hybrid.

The Hyundai Tucson has undoubtedly been a huge success for the Korean brand. Since it launched back in 2004, more than 7 million units have been sold worldwide, with the Tucson becoming something of an Irish sweetheart too. This car really hit its stride in 2015 with the launch of the third generation model. Almost immediately it took a stranglehold of the Irish new car market, closing in on established bestsellers and retaining the title of Ireland's bestselling car for much of the last few years.

Late in 2020, an all-new generation of the Hyundai Tucson arrived. Similar patterns are emerging with this car already securing the position of Ireland’s bestselling car so far in 2021.

What's new for the 2021 Hyundai Tucson?

It’s out with the old and in with the new. The previous generation of the Tucson has great notoriety on Irish roads. But the latest model will lift things up a gear. Hyundai is taking it to the next level with bold design and electrified powertrains for the first time.

Convention has gone out the back window with more angles, curves and dramatic light signatures that give the fourth generation Hyundai Tucson the taste of the avant-garde for the first time. Yes competition is fierce in the family SUV segment. The new Tuscon does not want to be vanilla.

With pricing starting from €33,595, the Hyundai Tuscon is moving up a gear. Yet presence, design, technology and quality speak volumes about this car.

Sportier and more dynamic proportions have been made possible by the new platform. On approach the car is characterised by a striking light architecture dubbed 'Parametric Hidden Lights’ that means the lights blend into the grille to give a jewel-like effect.

The new Tucson is available from €33,595 in Ireland
The new Tucson is available from €33,595 in Ireland

Inside the new Hyundai Tucson

New Tucson marks a significant change in design direction for Hyundai and the theme continues inside. The brand has done a wonderful job transforming the cabin. The Tuscon now reflects a more premium experience inside. It’s a combination of lots of soft touch materials, glossy digital screens for the infotainment and a digital instrument panel. There's also ambient lighting, and neat design touches like a rather avant-garde steering wheel!

Smartphones connect seamlessly to the infotainment system via Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The new 10.25-inch screen fills the centre of the vehicle. This is the first Hyundai model to feature a full touchscreen console with everything controlled from it but it is intuitive to use.

There are three trim levels, Comfort Plus, Executive and Executive Plus. Standard equipment includes 17″ alloys, heated front seats with electric lumbar support for the driver, automatic lights, high beam assist, reverse parking camera, 8″ touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and safety equipment including lane keep assist, driver attention alert and forward collision alert.

The interior of the new Hyundai Tucson
The interior of the new Hyundai Tucson

Is it practical?

The latest Hyundai Tucson is longer and wider than the car it replaces, and the wheelbase has also been increased by 10 mm. So now passengers can enjoy more space inside the vehicle. Boot space has been increased, offering up to 620 litres overall.

The new interior feels open and roomy. There is 26 mm of additional legroom in the rear. The rear seats of the all-new Tucson can now be folded in a 4:2:4 ratio with folding levers located on the side walls of the boot for extra convenience. This is a versatile family SUV, comfortable to travel in with competitive space on board for this class of vehicle.

The clever packaging of the battery for the hybrid means that there is no difference in interior space between diesel and hybrid models.

Boot space in the new Tucson
Boot space in the new Tucson

What's on offer?

On that note, the new Tucson completes the electrification of Hyundai’s SUV fleet in Europe, with mild hybrid, hybrid and plug-in hybrid available as well as a trusty diesel/diesel mild hybrid.

The diesel Tucson range uses a 1.6-litre engine and is available from €33,595. Pricing rises to €46,745 for a fully loaded four wheel drive model. Diesels cost between €210 and €280 to tax in Ireland.

The new Tucson petrol hybrid is available from €37,195 rising to €48,745. It uses a 1.6-litre petrol engine, electric motor, and 1.49 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery to reduce fuel consumption and lower CO2 emissions. It is paired with a six-speed automatic transmission and motor tax ranges from €200 to €210 per year in Ireland for this model.

A plug-in hybrid will join the new Tucson range in 2021. It has 265 hp and the ability to drive for short ranges on electric power only.

Driving the new Hyundai Tucson

The latest Hyundai Tucson has been developed and tested in Europe. The conventional dampers on the suspension use a new valve technology that offers more tuning flexibility. A MacPherson strut on the front and multi-link suspension on the rear are designed to ensure good levels of comfort and handling. The Tucson’s steering features a new generation Belt Drive steering gear for more smooth and connected steering.

The hybrid version I was testing uses a new 1.6-litre T-GDI turbo petrol engine, 44.2 kW electric motor and a 1.49 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery. It is paired with a six-speed automatic transmission (6AT). The system is the most powerful in the 2021 Hyundai Tucson powertrain line-up, with a combined output of 230 hp.

The new Tucson offers buyers more powertrain options than ever before
The new Tucson offers buyers more powertrain options than ever before

On the road, we can say that the new Tucson feels more premium than ever before. The cabin ambience is hugely rewarding. There's now a more comfortable and stable drive across motorway, town and rural roads. It’s comfortable for long distance motoring. The Tucson's hybrid transmission is seamless at work in the background.

Over a week of driving my average fuel consumption was 6.7 litres per 100 km. There is plenty of power and smoothness from the accelerator, with an amazing 230 hp available. The Tucson Hybrid is quiet around town and we think the fuel economy is respectable. But for high mileage motorway users, the diesel will still return the best economy.

Did you like it?

The Hyundai Tuscon has enjoyed an impressive drive to notoriety in Ireland and Europe. This new generation looks set to make this car an even more compelling choice than ever before. This SUV icon has been suitably modernised to help it lead in its segment. And command its price.

The outside of the car is smart and stylish, making a statement like never before. The interior of the car is a revelation, bringing a new premium style to the Tucson and a much anticipated digital upgrade.

This now feels like a design-led car. The ambition of Hyundai is palpable but it’s backed up by real choice in the powertrain department. With mild hybrid, hybrid, plug-in hybrid and diesel available, buyers now have amazing choice in the range. This hybrid gives the Tucson some great credentials as an alternative to diesel.

The Tucson sells itself with a reputation that precedes. But now it really delivers. Tucson can enjoy the time at the top; it won’t be going anywhere else anytime soon.

Tucson is now more premium than ever before!
Tucson is now more premium than ever before!

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Hyundai Tucson Executive Plus HEV
Price: €42,195
Engine: 1.6-litre petrol electric hybrid
Power: 230 hp
Torque: 265 Nm
0-100km/h:  8 seconds
Top speed: 193 k/h
Economy (WLTP): 5.7 l/100 km
CO2 emissions (WLTP): 130 g/km
Motor Tax:  €200 per year

 


The new Hyundai Tucson now on sale in Ireland

Hyundai Tucson (2021) Pricing For Ireland

The new Hyundai Tucson now on sale in Ireland
The new Hyundai Tucson now on sale in Ireland

The 2021 Hyundai Tucson has arrived in Ireland and will go on sale here priced from €32,495 with radical new styling, technology and new electrified powertrains, including hybrid and plug-in hybrid technology for the first time.

The all-new Tucson is the fourth generation of Hyundai’s successful bestseller with more than 7 million units sold around the globe since it launched in 2004. Of these, 1.4 million units have been sold in Europe. That makes it the company’s bestselling SUV globally. In Ireland the Tucson is consistently a top five bestseller and has been a huge success here.

Hyundai’s new compact SUV arrives on the market with a revolutionary new look that follows the company’s new 'Sensuous Sportiness' design identity. There is also a new interior with soft touch materials and a full touchscreen console.

The 2021 Hyundai Tucson is longer and wider than the car it replaces, and the wheelbase has also been increased by 10 mm so passengers can enjoy more space inside the vehicle. Boot space has been increased, offering up to 620 litres overall.

Inside the 2021 Hyundai Tucson
Inside the 2021 Hyundai Tucson

There are three trim levels, Comfort Plus, Executive and Executive Plus, with standard equipment including 17" alloys, heated front seats with electric lumbar support for the driver, automatic lights, high beam assist, reverse parking camera, 8" touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and safety equipment including lane keep assist, driver attention alert and forward collision alert.

The diesel Tucson range uses a 1.6-litre engine and is available from €32,495 rising to €38,245. This model will cost €270 to tax in Ireland.

The new Tucson petrol hybrid is available from €35,995 rising to €41,745. It uses a 1.6-litre petrol engine, electric motor, and 1.49 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery to reduce fuel consumption and lower CO2 emissions. It is paired with a six-speed automatic transmission and motor tax is €210 per year in Ireland for this model.

A plug-in hybrid will join the new Tucson range in 2021.

Tucson on sale in Ireland from €32,495
Tucson on sale in Ireland from €32,495

The new Hyundai Kona Hybrid

Hyundai Kona Hybrid Review

The new Hyundai Kona Hybrid
The new Hyundai Kona Hybrid on test for Changing Lanes!

Read Caroline's Hyundai Kona Hybrid review for everything you need to know about Hyundai's popular compact crossover, now with a hybrid engine.

Hyundai hit the jackpot when they launched the new Kona back in 2017. Riding on a wave of success with the popular Tucson family SUV, the Korean brand took a grip on the compact crossover class with the Kona and hasn’t let go since. It’s slipped quietly into a top 5 position as one of Ireland's bestselling cars and trounced all upon the competition.

So what's so special about the Hyundai Kona?

The Hyundai Kona offers buyers an on-trend compact car with rugged crossover-inspired styling and stance. But aside from aesthetics, it also offers buyers impressive choice. In what is still unusual for the compact crossover class, the Kona is now available in Ireland as a hybrid, electric vehicle or with a simple combustion engine (petrol or diesel).

The Hyundai Kona Electric has been a favourite at Changing Lanes since we drove it in 2019. We were impressed with how well the electric powertrain blended with the charismatic crossover and a range in excess of 400 km made range anxiety a thing of the past.

Now in 2020 the Hyundai Kona Hybrid comes to market with a 1.6-litre petrol electric powertrain that means emissions are rated at just 101 g/km. Fuel consumption is quoted by the manufacturer as 5.0 l/100km under WLTP. With the Kona Hybrid, buyers who require a traditional fuel powered car can now reconcile their conscious with a more fuel efficient hybrid.

The new Kona Hybrid goes on sale from €29,050, using a 6-speed automatic gearbox to deliver power to the front wheels. For reference, the Hyundai Kona 1.0-litre petrol manual goes on sale from €21,400, while the diesel range starts from €23,400. At the top of the range, the Hyundai Kona Electric retails from €39,300 including grants and VRT relief.

The Kona Hybrid is cheap to run with lower emissions
The Kona Hybrid is cheap to run with lower emissions

What's new for the Kona Hybrid?

Hybrids are all the rage at the moment. The Kona Hybrid packs this technology into an already successful compact. On the outside a discreet hybrid logo at the rear. New 18" alloy wheels differentiate it from the rest of the combustion engined Kona range. Yet the Kona's rugged good looks are retained. Along with distinct front end lighting, robust plastic cladding around the sills, bumpers and wheel arches, and two tone colour combinations.

The Kona Hybrid still rides a little bit higher than a standard hatchback. But drives pretty much like the latter - part of its appeal. It's also a practical vehicle. Though being compact by dimensions means that legroom can get tight in the back for taller passengers. Boot space hasn't been impacted and it remains akin to any family hatchback with 361 litres and a flat loading sill.

The interior of the 2020 Hyundai Kona Hybrid
The interior of the 2020 Hyundai Kona Hybrid

Inside the Kona

The Hyundai Kona Hybrid has an identical interior to the rest of the Kona combustion engine range. Everything is simple and logically laid out. There are a few additional interfaces to relay information to the driver about the hybrid system and power flow between engine, battery and electric motor.

Hard plastics do feature a lot. Though the Hybrid does get its own dedicated interior colour pack to add interest to what is otherwise a relatively subdued affair. There are white accents around the air vent surrounds and gear shift bezel. There's glossy black accents on the door handles and steering wheel.

There is a good level of standard equipment: 7" touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, heated front seats, climate control, electronic parking brake, cruise control, rear view camera and wireless phone charger.

Kona Hybrid on sale in Ireland priced from €29,050
Kona Hybrid on sale in Ireland priced from €29,050

Driving it

On the road the Kona takes off in near silence, benefiting from that electrical assistance from the hybrid powertrain. The dual clutch automatic gearbox makes driving in town easy, while the Kona is naturally agile in that environment. It also performs well on larger roads despite its compact proportions, with decent levels of comfort and refinement.

The hybrid powertrain itself uses a 1.6-litre petrol engine, 1.56 kWh battery and 32 kW motor to deliver a maximum hybrid system power of 141 hp and 265 Nm to the front wheels. The bias in the transmission is to efficiency so it would be foolish to expect exciting performance from this car. But buyers should be more interested in how they can save fuel using the Kona Hybrid and drive in an eco-friendly manner. In that regard the hybrid does deliver and with a patient right foot, we achieved average fuel consumption of 5.4 litres per 100 km. Motor tax for this model is currently just €190 per year.

Did you like it?

Hyundai is a brand keen to try new things and embrace trends in the motor industry. In many ways, they are one of the driving forces behind innovation in the motor industry right now. They offer alternative technologies to more people, while creating stylish, practical vehicles that sit comfortably among consumers.

At Changing Lanes, we adore the Kona Electric. Yet the nature of the technology and powerful 64 kWh battery means the price tag still puts it out of reach of buyers of small crossovers.

At the entry into the range, the 1.0-litre petrol Kona will satisfy the needs of many compact crossover buyers. All at very competitive pricing.

The Kona Hybrid offers cheaper running costs. Yet the price positioning opens the field to more competition from the family crossover/SUV segment that may see it overlooked for more spacious vehicles. Yet the Kona Hybrid is undeniably an efficient vehicle using the latest hybrid technology. We look forward to seeing it evolve into 2021.

Once of the few hybrid compact crossovers on the market, the Kona is a stylish and fuel efficient way to travel
Once of the few hybrid compact crossovers on the market, the Kona is a stylish and fuel efficient way to travel

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Hyundai Kona Hybrid with 2 tone roof
Price: 
€29,650
Engine: 1.6-litre petrol electric hybrid
Power: 
141 hp
Torque: 265 Nm
0-100km/h:  
11.6 seconds
Top speed: 160 km/h
Fuel economy (WLTP): 5.0 l/100km
CO2 emissions: 101 g/km
Motor Tax:  €190 per year


The new Hyundai i10 on test for Changing Lanes!

Hyundai i10 (2020) Review

The new Hyundai i10 on test for Changing Lanes!
The new Hyundai i10 on test for Changing Lanes!

Caroline drives the Hyundai i10.

The latest generation of the Hyundai i10 goes on sale in Ireland, priced from €14,800. Small and simple, the Hyundai i10 is the most popular city car on sale in the country. Now Hyundai has launched an all-new model, billing it as "the small car that makes the big statement." In Ireland the new i10 will build on the success of the previous generation, a former Irish Car of the Year category winner, which has established itself well in the A segment.

What's new for the 2020 Hyundai i10?

The i10 offers a lot for a starting price of just €14,800, rising to €18,450 for a top of the range automatic model. Hyundai promises a youthful spirit, and certainly in a bright colour like the blue of our test car, the i10 helps you find the bright side of life.

Hyundai has modernised the design of the i10 to provide maximum interior space within a small footprint. It is 20 mm wider and 20 mm shorter compared to the previous model, giving it a wider, sportier stance on the road. The belt line has been lowered to improve visibility for driver and passengers. The front end is quite distinct with a wide grille incorporating round LED daytime running lights with a honeycomb pattern. At the rear, two new horizontal creases lines break up the soft surfaces of the boot and run into the taillights. The X-shaped C-pillar is a nice touch especially in combination with the two tone roof option, drawing the eye to the pillar-mounted i10 logo.

The new i10 goes on sale from €14,800 in Ireland
The new i10 goes on sale from €14,800 in Ireland

What’s the range like in Ireland?

There is one petrol engine available for the new i10 in Ireland. It's a naturally aspirated 1.0-litre affair that falls into motor tax band A with annual motor tax of just €180 or €190 per year depending on trim and alloy wheel size. There are three trim levels - Classic (from €14,800), Deluxe (from €16,250) and Deluxe Plus (from €17,250). A five speed manual comes as standard with the option of an automatic. The Deluxe Plus model on test with a two tone roof retails from €17,650.

Standard features include leather wrapped steering wheel, split folding seats, driver’s height adjustment, cruise control, Bluetooth, electric front windows, driver attention warning, lane keep assist and forward collision warning. The Deluxe adds 15” alloys, electric door mirrors, manual air conditioning, rear privacy glass, front fog lights, and LED daytime running lights. Deluxe Plus adds 8” touchscreen with Android Auto/Apple Car Play, wireless charger and rear parking camera.

I was driving the i10 Deluxe Plus with two tone roof, which is clearly the cool one. The circular daytime running lamps, two tone roof and cheeky i10 scripted in a flick of black at the rear of the car bestow some character upon the smallest Hyundai. It’s visual stance is improved by its lowered roof and wider body.

The interior of the new Hyundai i10
The interior of the new Hyundai i10

Inside the new Hyundai i10

Inside, Hyundai designers have tried to give the i10 a youthful impression without compromising usability. The i10 is a well packaged small car with generous interior space for this class of vehicle and plenty of storage. The wheelbase has been increased by 40 mm for this new model, to create more interior space. At 252 litres, the boot is one of the largest in the segment. They have also lowered the lift-in height compared to the previous model and there is also a two-stage luggage board.

The interior feels good for a small car, and while there are a lot of hard plastics, at this price we don't really care. The 8" touchscreen with Apple Car Play and Android Auto comes as standard on the Deluxe Plus to give a pleasant technology upgrade.

There is also an impressive list of safety features available for such a small car. We couldn’t help but notice the little lane assist symbol making sure we had good lane discipline. We also noted the rear reversing camera. The new i10 is equipped with the latest Hyundai SmartSense active safety and driving assistance features including Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA), High Beam Assist (HBA), Lane Keep Assist System (LKA), Driver Attention Warning (DAW) and the Intelligent Speed Limit Warning (ISLW).

The Hyundai i10 is powered by a small petrol engine
The Hyundai i10 is powered by a small petrol engine

Driving the i10

The new i10 has been designed, developed, and manufactured in Europe. The brand say handling has been improved through changes to the rear suspension and steering system. A small urban runaround powered by a simple 1.0-litre petrol engine with less than 70 hp, means that you won't be trying anything silly behind the wheel. But as a simple means of A to B, it does go and go. I had it on the motorway and it was not a problem.

This car is perfect for nipping to the shops and excels in the urban environment with its super compact dimensions making it easy to park. Controls are light, with not much weight in the steering at all. It’s far from a sports car but this makes it ideal for parking. The i10 covers town, country and even motorway without any fuss. The i10's small non-turbo petrol engine will have to work hard to get to 100 kmh – 14.6 seconds in fact - but once it gets there, it's quiet with a decent level of refinement and comfort for such a small car.

The Hyundai i10 has its market and the brand has modernised the i10 sufficiently to keep the target market happy with an improved interior and updated styling and equipment. The engine is not a performance star but it offers good economy and over a week of driving my fuel consumption averaged at 5.0 litres per 100 km.

The i10 is easy to drive and park in its natural habitat around town, but behaves like a bigger car should you take it out onto major roads.

Hyundai has had great success in Ireland with their small car offering including the i10, i20 and Kona compact crossover. The i10 makes a great case on price and gear, making itself still very relevant to the Irish market.

Plenty of small car charm to be found in the new i10
Plenty of small car charm to be found in the new i10

Caroline Kidd

Model tested: Hyundai i10 Deluxe Plus with 2 tone roof
Price: 
€17,650
Engine: 1.0-litre petrol
Power: 
67 hp
Torque: 96 Nm
0-100km/h:  
14.8 seconds
Top speed: 156 km/h
Fuel economy (WLTP): 4.8-5.9 l/100km
CO2 emissions (WLTP): 120 g/km
Motor Tax:  €190 per year


The new Hyundai Prophecy EV concept

Hyundai Prophecy EV Concept Breaks Cover

The new Hyundai Prophecy EV concept
The new Hyundai Prophecy EV concept

This is the Hyundai Prophecy, a new EV concept that was originally planned for the 2020 Geneva Motor Show that never was. It turned into a digital car premiere. But we reckon you may have missed some of the details about this unusual concept in the mélee surrounding COVID-19 and its effect on the motor industry. 

Now Luc Donckerwolke, Hyundai Motor Group’s Chief Design Officer, has been giving more insight into the design of the brand's new EV concept. Remember, Hyundai is the brand that has thus far given us the Hyundai IONIQ Electric and the very popular KONA Electric. They know quite a lot about making electric cars for the mass market, but what about high end electric wagons like the Prophecy?

The Hyundai Prophecy points to a flagship EV model from the brand. It's inspired by the vintage cars of the 1920s and 30s, with a smooth, coupe-like design. Sweeping curves and smooth lines set it apart from the angular 45, another Hyundai concept car which debuted at the IAA in 2019.

However, like 45, it features show stopping pixel lights. We love the dynamic shape and sporty rear spoiler. The propeller-shaped wheels reduce air resistance. This look is based on what Hyundai call 'Sensuous Sportiness'!

“The word ‘sensuous’ integrates the value of more emotion in our designs. ‘Sportiness’ implies dynamics, to be reactive of what’s happening around us,” says Donckerwolke. “Sensuous Sportiness is not about a new language or philosophy. It’s about a new concept in the creation of our cars.”

The interior of the Hyundai Prophecy
The interior of the Hyundai Prophecy

The Hyundai Prophecy interior

Inside, Hyundai has used dark colours and natural materials to create 'a completely new type of in-car experience'. There is no steering wheel, just joysticks left and right of the driver. The brand says this gives a more spacious interior, more comfortable seating position while driving, and also frees up more space on the dashboard for other features.

In addition, 90 per cent of the vehicle’s functions can be controlled via buttons on the joysticks. So there is no need for the driver to take their hands off the joysticks to change the music!

The Prophecy also previews a new Smart Posture Care System (SPCS) that allows drivers to enjoy an optimised seating position based on their body characteristics. The driver can either adjust the seat manually, or allow the car to suggest a “smart” seating position for them. In “smart” mode, the driver enters their height, seated height, and weight, and the car automatically adjusts to the driver’s individual physical condition.

When not driving, the car can be used as an entertainment space by switching into Relax Mode. This reclines the seats while the dashboard swivels upwards for a better position to view entertainment shown on the display. The theory behind this concept is that as autonomous driving technology progresses, the potential for vehicles to be used as relaxation spaces will grow in importance.

The Prophecy is a high end Tesla challenger
The Prophecy is a high end Tesla challenger from Hyundai

Anything else?

The Prophecy can clean the air when particle levels inside the vehicle get too high by taking in fresh air and purifying it, then circulating it through the car. It does while the car is driving, when it is idling or charging, and even if no one is inside.

Like the 45 concept, the Hyundai Prophecy EV concept is built using the Electric Global Modular Platform or “E-GMP” – Hyundai’s first dedicated EV platform. Hyundai says this electric powertrain is much more compact than an internal-combustion counterpart, meaning there is no need for a wide front hood or a bulky centre console.

This allows automotive designers to reclaim the space for passenger use, and to reimagine the range of in-car experiences.